The Learning Farm – Graduation

Today we were invited to attend the graduation ceremony for “Batch 27” – the 27th class to graduate.  TLF is a special school where the attendees stay for 100 days (some 200) and learn organic farming, plus math, computer, English, etc.  What a great day!  Most of these kids come from pretty rough backgrounds and difficult circumstances (including 2 refugees from Afghanistan and 1 from Ethiopia), and they are able to come to the farm and 100 days later graduate with newfound skills, knowledge and friends.

LDS Charities has helped the farm with computer desks, lockers, bedding and kitchen equipment.  We attended simply to observe and support the farm and the kids – but instead, when we got there we were ‘special guests’ – they had me speak on behalf of LDSC, had DeeAnn and I present diplomas to a couple of the students and also had us give 2 of the top 10 students a special pin.  I was also given a special scarf from East Nusa Tengarra from the student dancers.  What an honor….

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“Your Success Depends on Your Dreams”

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The 32 graduates

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With Emily (Asst Driector) and Maliko, a member of the Board of Directors and a Founding Partner

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Wearing my scarf – with Abdigoni (Ethiopia) and Hamid (Afghanistan).  Abidgoni was one of the top graduates.  The UNHCR (United Nations High Commission on Refugees) had paid to send them to TLF.

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Presenting a pin

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Presenting a pin

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With Anoni, one of the dancers, wearing dress typical to East Nusa Tengarra

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The multi-purpose area all decked out

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The top ten graduates

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The dancers

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Smiles and tears of the graduates!

TLF is a great project and so fulfilling to see what they do.  It’s a privilege for LDSC to be able to be one of their donors.

2 responses to “The Learning Farm – Graduation”

  1. MaryandBill Pier says :

    This sounds like a great program but I was wondering how the graduates do in either getting a job or in staring their own business that allows them to support themselves and their families?

    Like

    • davidlbuell says :

      That’s a great question – and one that the Farm struggles with. The kids learn a lot but to start their own ag business takes money – which they do not have. Most of them try and grow vegetables on a borrowed plot of land and sell them. Some get ag-related jobs, others farm on the side or for someone.

      Like

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