Odds & Ends

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Kenya, one of our YSA’s.  She’s a physician

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Apparently the latest in Indonesian modern dress ware.  Not sure I’m game…

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I’m not sure which is worse – the mannequin or the clothes

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The female version of the newest….DeeAnn didn’t think much of it..

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This little girl is about 5 – selling roses car to car in the traffic jam.  We bought one – 20,000 Rp. ($1.50)

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Nor sure if he’s selling the koi for decorative ponds or tonight’s dinner.

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Always love taking pics of stuff people carry on their bikes.

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Another load…

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Four on a bike

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Good friends the Jensen’s at our last dinner with just them.  We are the only mission couples in Jakarta and there’s no one else to pal around with.

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Selling peanuts and fruit on the street – and keeping the sun off….

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Carrying tubes of something

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Cooking sate ayam

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Our buddy Tony wanted to buy us lunch at his favorite Chinese warung in Chinatown.  Delish.

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Handcart shoe store

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Fruit and vegetable stand – everywhere…

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riding side -saddle

 

Odds & Ends

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Slaving away…

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“Tukan jahit keliling” – a small sewing machine on a bike – taking repairs to where they are needed.

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“Wayang” – Javanese puppet characters

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Boys wearing typical Muslim clothing

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Carrying diapers

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Our other guard buddy – Joko.  He speaks pretty good English and I call him President because the Indonesian President is also Joko.

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Carrying plastic planter tubs

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Volcano in Cirebon

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Tiny tailor shop on the street

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A masjid in the marketplace

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At the palace in Cirebon

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Dr.Anderson trying durian ice cream

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the team at dinner

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Becak

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Becak seat – hard and narrow

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At the palace

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Food cart on a bike

 

MNC – Cirebon Day 3

Basically, more training of the doctors, nurses, and midwives to they can train others.

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Dr. Groberg

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Bima, one of our translators

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Nurse Nancy an avid University of Utah fan wanted to go swimming, but needed a tee shirt.  So ever-vigilant Elder Buell to the rescue, making sure she wore this one!

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Bonnie Grobertg, Dr. Tari and DeeAnn.  Dr Tari is head of Pernasia

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Bima (our translator) practicing being a mom!

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Dr. Groberg brought cowboy hats for the training leaders.

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Old friends.  Dr.Tari and Dr. Groberg met when he was Mission President here and she was walking in her neighborhood, which was near the mission home.

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Dr.Robison letting them practice.  He’s Medical Director at St. Mark’s in Salt Lake.

Maternal & Newborn Care – Cirebon Day 2

Today was a continuation of training, although today was Helping Babies Breathe.

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Dr, Robison

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Dr. Anderson

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Dr. Visick

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Dr. Groberg

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Break Time!

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Maternal & Newborn Care – Cirebon 1

After the training in Jakarta, we took a 3 hour train straight east to Cirebon.  The terrain was SO different than our usual train ride to Bandung.  The Bandung  trip is through jungle, terraced rice fields, and mountains, rivers and gorges.  This trip was totally flat with endless rice fields.

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The training was at the Hotel Santika – very nice.

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Huge open air lobby – and no, there were no mosquitoes….

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Hotel pool

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Day 1 training – Helping Mothers Survive

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Dr. Anderson

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Nurse Nancy

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All the “stuff” supplied by LDSC

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Dr, Robison

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Day 1 Class

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Dr. Groberg brought American cowboy hats for the organization leaders!

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post-meeting debrief…

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We commandeered an Angkot for a round trip to dinner.  100,000 Rp ($7.50) for all 12.

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They all fit!

!

Maternal and Newborn Care – Jakarta

The MNC team is here, so we are accompanying them in their training meetings with Perinasia, the Indonesia Pediatric Association.  The US team trains Indonesian doctors, midwives and nurses in special baby and mother-care techniques, and then they in turn train others in the more remote villages.

First we had a kickoff dinner:

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The kickoff dinner at Kembang Goella

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Dhini, Dr. Titi, Dr. Tari and Sari.  Dr’s Titi and Tari were school friends from way back and Sari is the Perinasia manager.

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President Rowley with Dr.s Groberg and Anderson

The first day of training was at the Perinasia offices in Jakarta.

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Dr. Visick lecturing

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breakout session with Nancy Squire (OB nurse)

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With Dr. Robison

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Our translators – Setiaman, Tony, Natalia, Bima and Vanessa

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Tony practicing for a future role….

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I’m not sure I can add a thing…….the picture says it all…

 

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The team and the students

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Graduates

 

 

 

LDS Humanitarian Efforts

Being Humanitarian Missionaries for the LDS Church and representing LDS Charities been one of the great blessings of our lives.  It has changed our lives forever.  Doing what we believe the Savior would do if He were here has strengthened us in so many ways.  Hopefully, the lives of people we have served have been blessed,  but if not, it has at least changed the way we look at the world.

If you’ve read the blog, you know the scope of what we do in Indonesia.  It is a microcosm of what the Church does worldwide, but the Church does so much more as highlighted in this article from World Religion News:

http://www.worldreligionnews.com/religion-news/christianity/lds-church-has-spent-1-2-billion-on-welfare-and-humanitarian-efforts

And for those of you who have not seen the Church website on its Humanitarian efforts, please check it out:

http://www.ldscharities.org

Those of you who are LDS, we can’t encourage you enough to consider serving in this effort.  As a full-time missionary, it’s beyond rewarding!  (Note: if you are not LDS, you might have trouble getting the Church to let you serve an LDS Mission – surprising I know!)

So LDS or not, full-time missionaries or not, you can still make a difference!  There are so many places that could use your help a few hours a week or month: homeless shelters, libraries, community food banks, adult reading academies, refugee centers, etc., etc., etc..

We have loved doing what we have been doing.  We encourage and invite you to do what you can – you’ll love it too!

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And there’s a million more pictures just like this…..what a WONDERFUL experience this has been!